BSAP – PHOTOS

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BSAP – 28MM FIGURES

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Eureka miniatures of Australia have produced a set of British Army in Aden figures in 28mm scale which actually would do for certain uniforms of the BSAP from the early part of the war until the very end.

I may be wrong but I believe this was riot and patrol uniform worn by all units depending on the situation. Police Reserve and the A and B Reserve also wore this uniform of Dark Blue floppy hat, Dark blue trousers tucked into boots and grey shirt. Early part of the war they would have at least one old style British 56 pattern ammunition pouch on the hip. These lovely figures have two pouches and a water bottle. You could cut some off.

Peaked caps would also be worn with this type uniform.

Weapons such as shot guns, pump action shot guns, 303s, SLRs and later FNs were used by these units.

 

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BSAP – SCRATCH BUILDING 28MM FIGURES

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Eureka miniatures of Australia have produced a set of British Army in Aden figures in 28mm scale which actually would do for certain uniforms of the BSAP from the early part of the war until the very end.

I may be wrong but I believe this was riot and patrol uniform worn by all units depending on the situation. Police Reserve and the A and B Reserve also wore this uniform of Dark Blue floppy hat, Dark blue trousers tucked into boots and grey shirt. Early part of the war they would have at least one old style British 56 pattern ammunition pouch on the hip. These lovely figures have two pouches and a water bottle. You could cut some off.

Peaked caps would also be worn with this type uniform.

Weapons such as shot guns, pump action shot guns, 303s, SLRs and later FNs were used by these units.

Creating and Painting early BSAP, PATU, and RR figures

1 box of Perry Miniatures 28mm plastic 8th Army Figures.

Metal slouch hats.

BSAP Figures.

For the BSAP figures I cut off back straps and some water bottles and 44 ammo pouches. I scraped off the gaiters leaving socks.

Thus the Perry figures 28mm plastic miniatures gave me early BSAP and PATU armed with 303s with shorts and I added miliput to create trousers. Trimmed off webbing where necessary.

I purchased soft hats and peaked cap heads from Gripping Beast WW1 range.

 

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Note the tracker in slouch hat and trousers with 303. Slouch hat from the Perry Figures 28mm range.

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PATU Figures.

Early PATU figures had 44 packs attached. The 44 packs were from the Perry Miniatures range. Trimmed metal slouch hats with modelling clippers and filed with fine file the top and edges to make it look like a bush hat.

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Rhodesia Regiment figures.

Early Rhodesia Regiment (RR) figures with Bren guns were from the Perry 8th Army Plastic figures range. Added trousers with miliput. Cut and trimmed Perry Miniatures slouch hats to make bush hats. Added 44 packs from the Perry Miniatures range.

Cut and trimmed Bren guns to create different stances with the weapon.

28mm 1/56th scale BSAP vehicles

David Freemantles 1/56 ish vehicle models for RBW wargames. I have quite a few of his models and they are excellent and look the part, as can be seen from my blog. Davids details and comment:-

David Freemantle email is freemantledavid@yahoo.com.au Could you please let people know that it takes a bit of time to make them, just lately I have been hard pressed to keep up with orders, just over 30 models still to build that post I just did is for one guy in the UK for his museum and still have 5 more for him to build.

 

 

British South African Police

Scratch building BSAP 28mm figures

While we wait for manufacturers to come out with new figures I thought I would try my hand at a bit of scratch building BSAP figures.

Using my box of Perry Miniatures 8th Army 28mm figures I decided to make a batch of BSAP figures.

BSAP Figures.

I purchased soft hats and peaked cap heads from Gripping Beast WW1 range.

Also I sent off for a number of weapons packs from WWW.THEASSAULTGROUP.COM.

In this case I ordered FN assault rifles for my figures.

Thus the Perry figures 28mm plastic miniatures gave me BSAP in shorts and I added peaked cap heads, 44 ammo pouches and FN rifles. Trimmed off the 303s, and webbing where necessary.

For the BSAP figures I cut off back straps and some water bottles and 44 ammo pouches. I scraped off the gaiters leaving socks. I also cut off the bayonet. In some cases I kept the water bottle but trimmed the cap and straps to make it look like an ammo pouch. BSAP in Patrol Order would also wear leather leggings which were highly polished.

Even towards the end of the war the BSAP in Patrol Order would have a 44 ammo pouch on their hip to carry FN magazines.

I attached one 44 ammo pouch from the box set to some of the figures.

The peaked cap heads and FN rifles were attached using Rapide epoxy glue.

Colours as per my previous post on the BSAP.

I recently bought the book ‘Blue and Old Gold’, the history of the BSAP.

Scenarios.

You could have a vehicle patrol of 6 BSAP troopers a PO (Patrol Officer) and 5 constables in a mine protected Land Rover, Leopard or Cougar, in a remote area or village being ambushed. Numbers could vary. Larger vehicles might also be used.

You could have an attack on a remote BSAP post somewhere in the bush. In later years police posts were defended with grenade screens, sand bag walls, bunkers, earth banks, embrasures, and other defences.

You could also have a police follow up after a Terr attack. Police tracking and dog teams could be brought in for this.

 

 

 

 

BSAP-MARMON HARRINGTON ARMOURED CAR

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Marmon Herrington Armoured Cars in Rhodesia

Many thanks to Wayne Kennerly for the use of his information.

Around 30-40 Marmon-Herrington armoured cars are believed to have been supplied to the Rhodesians from 1942. These vehicles had a South African designed, welded armoured hull that was mounted on imported Canadian Ford 60cwt truck chassis. The chassis had been converted to 4-wheel drive using the American Marmon-Herrington kits. Most of the Rhodesian vehicles were the 117” WB, 5.3 tonne MkIII, fitted with a V8 rated at 85hp. The slope sided turret was made to fit a Vickers MG and Boys Anti Tank rifle as well as a Bren gun fitted to an Anti Aircraft  mounting. However in Rhodesia the vehicles were only fitted with a Bren .303 light machine gun in place of the Vickers.

 

Two armoured cars units were formed within The Rhodesia Regiment, one in Bulawayo (2nd Battalion) and one in Salisbury (1st Battalion), the Salisbury unit was commanded by Capt. A.N. (Arty) Evans.

 

Marmon-Herringtons, armed with water cooled Vickers, were also supplied to the Southern Rhodesian Armoured Car Regiment, formerly the Rhodesian Reconnaissance Regiment, who were re-formed and reinforced at Gil Gil (East Africa) and were commanded by Lt. Col. J. Blakiston-Houston of the 11th Hussars. During the Abyssinian campaign, there were three Squadrons all commanded by British Army but with mostly Rhodesian personnel. After their training one squadron entered Abyssinia via Addis Ababa, one over the mountains via the Assab Trail and down to the shores of the red sea and the last went to Kombolshie. They were however too late to take part in the fighting and were mainly used for patrolling the conquered areas.

 

After the East African Campaign the unit was due to proceed to the Middle East, however civil disturbances arose on the copperbelt in Northern Rhodesia. The unit immediately force marched to the copperbelt, where the disturbances were ended once the ringleader had been deported. The unit personnel left by train for Southern Rhodesia and the armoured cars went to the King’s African Rifles who took them back to East Africa. The Rhodesian personnel later transferred to the South Africa forces where they trained on Sherman tanks and eventually took part in the Italian Campaign.

 

When the Southern Rhodesian Armoured Car Regiment was re-formed in 1947, under Lt. Col. C.V. King, the three squadrons (one in Bulawayo, one in Salisbury and another in Umtali), were equipped with the Bren fitted Marmon-Herringtons. These were augmented by 20 heavier and more powerful Staghound armoured cars fitted with the 37mm gun.

 

The Marmon-Herringtons continued with the SRACR until they were disbanded again in 1956, they (or at least some of them) then passed onto the Rhodesian Police Force, the British South Africa Police (BSAP), where the vehicles were used by an ‘elite’ Police Reserve unit known as the ‘Recce Unit’.

 

It appears the vehicles were originally painted police grey, however at some stage they were painted dark blue with ‘POLICE’ in white down the side. They were also at some stage fitted with an octagonal barbette in place of the gun turret. Six of the vehicles were based in Bulawayo, with more in Salisbury and possibly at other centres. These vehicles saw very little active Police service as they were very expensive on fuel and were more ’boys toys’ which encouraged people to join the Police Reserve.

 

They were used occasionally for patrols and road blocks during times of rioting. Certainly they were used during riots in Salisbury. The cartoon below is based on an incident where the brave tankers sailed into a rioting mob, spewing gas, with all hell breaking loose about it. Suddenly, with a snort and a bang, the poor old dinosaur ground to a halt. The lid popped open and an equally ancient silver haired chappie, with a vigorous moustache and many medal ribbons, called out to the nearest of the rioter’s “Iwe Shuva’ (You push!). This they obligingly did, until with a splutter and a bang, the old car moved on again – and the riot re-commenced! This says much about Police/Public relations in those days!

It appears that by 1972, the Recce Unit had ceased its use of the Marmon-Herringtons, after they had served for some 30 years. A number are known to be in museums in Zimbabwe, one in the Mutare Museum, at least four in the Gweru Military Museum and possibly one in the Harare Museum.

 

At least one of the armoured cars was used in a civil capacity. A security company in Umtali (now Mutare) used one for carrying cash around in the early 1970s.

Modelling:-

Perry Miniatures do a 28mm 1/56th scale Marmon Harrington in their WWII range which can be changed to this version.

There are other manufacturers who do 20mm or 1/76th versions. (Wesp, MMS Models, Attack models, SHQ Models).

I hope individuals will not mind me using their images.

 

BSAP – SUPPORT UNIT ON PARADE

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Police Support Unit

The BSAP Support Unit, more commonly called ‘The Black Boots’, developed from a venerable and colourfull tradition. It might be said that the Unit could trace its descent from the Reserve Company of 150 Angoni tribesmen recruited in 1898. Later in its life the Unit performed ceremonial duties. With the onset of the bush war Support Unit became very active in the anti-guerrilla campaign. It expanded in size and range of operations. In keeping with its demanding military role, the Unit adopted a crest and shoulder flash depicting an eagle about to strike and the motto Pamberi ne Gondo (Forward with the Eagle).

I found these photos in Contact II and the coloured illustration in the history of the BSAP (Blue and Old Gold).